With surf fishing, remember that fish are tight against the shore, so make most of your casts parallel to the sand. Don’t send your cast out too far.

The best tides range from half rising to half falling – especially when early or late in the day. Of course, if there is bait, the predators will always be there, but it just makes it easier if fishing during the half tides.

If you fish by an inlet, fish in the outgoing water which brings the bait out to sea. This will hold the best action for strikes. Just let the outgoing water carry your bait out in a natural way.

Find a beachfront – they all of their share of structures such as holes, pockets, rocks, reefs, and other things. These will hold fish, and locating them is critical if you want success. Also find spots where channels lead to deep water – these will often times hold game fish. The fish usually follow these deeper channels until food is found.

Fish aggressively by walking back and forth and fishing areas that appear likely to hold fish. You can see the boils of feeding fish in hot spots – and keep an eye out for bait. Watch the birds as well; they are one of the best indicators of fish in the area.

Obviously, use the freshest live-bait possible, and change it often. You really want your bait on bottom, with a lighter weight – this will give you the best chance for stimulating strikes.

When using lures, use ones that can be cast easily. Switch out often to get to different depths, and experiment with the speed of retrieve. Use finer-diameter monofilament line because it gives better action to both natural baits and artificial lures.

If you hook a big one, keep it in front of you as you wind it in – running as you need to. As you bring it close, it will make a few runs out – just drop your tip and let it go. When it gets really close, use the waves to bring it even closer – timing it.